Preserving Cultural Heritage

The Fight for Alabama’s Last Wild Places Podcast

Anne Markham Bailey has just released an interesting podcast series, interviewing thirteen founding members of Wild South, and capturing the story of their efforts to change management practices in the Bankhead National Forest. This engaging series of podcasts will unfold over a four-week period, recalling Wild South’s origin in advocacy, and reflecting on the benefit…

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Mystery of the Trees, June Movie Night

Friday, June 9, 6:30 p.m. Wild South office, 552 Lawrence Street, Moulton, AL 35650 Trail trees, trail marker trees, Crooked Trees, “Prayer Trees”, “Thong Trees”, or “Culturally Modified Trees” are hardwood trees throughout North America that Native Americans intentionally shaped with distinctive characteristics that convey that the tree was shaped by human activity rather than…

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Appalachian Indian Trails by Lamar Marshall

Appalachian Indian Trails By Lamar Marshall Three hundred years ago, the southern Appalachians were home to the sovereign Cherokee Nation. Over fifty towns and settlements were connected by a well-worn system of foot trails, some of which later became wagon roads turnpiked by Cherokee turnpike companies. This Indian trail system, which climaxed around 1800, was…

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Bartram and the Unparalleled Cascade of Falling Creek and Mount Magnolia

By Lamar Marshall, Cultural Heritage Director, Wild South In his Travels, William Bartram describes what I consider to be the three most elusive episodes in his journey from South Carolina to Cowee Town in 1775. These accounts include meeting the Cherokee strawberry-picking maidens, whom I am convinced he encountered on Green’s Creek just east of Cowee…

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The Cherokee Territorial Claim Circa 1700

Connect with Cherokee Journeys on Facebook   By Lamar Marshall, Wild South Cultural Heritage Director Around 1700, the Cherokee people were a powerful tribe of Native Americans who were uncontrolled by world powers and politics because of their remote and isolated homeland that lay west of the Appalachian Mountains. The seaboard colonies of the British…

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The Cherokee Landscape and Buffalo Economy

  Connect with Cherokee Journeys on Facebook   By Lamar Marshall, Wild South Cultural Heritage Director At the dawn of the historical era in North America, perhaps earlier than 1400, several ecological events coalesced to change the way of life for native peoples living east of the Mississippi River.  For centuries, native people created agriscapes…

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Explore the New Cherokee Journey Website

This site is focused on the history of the Cherokees who remained in the mountains of western North Carolina from 1776 up until the recognition of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians (EBCI) by the United States Congress in 1866. The site was created through funding by Google Earth, the Cherokee Preservation Foundation (CPF),…

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Noland Creek Cherokee Trail Field Trip

Wild South Cultural Heritage Director, Lamar Marshall led a field trip with ten Cherokee youth in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park last week along a historic Cherokee trail known today as the Noland Creek Trail.  The group was sponsored by Cherokee Choices, a diabetes prevention program that encourages members of the Eastern Band of…

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Anitsalagi Tsunatseli Deganvnv

“Before there were roads, there were only trails. Before there were wheels, there were only hooves, feet and paws. Before the earth was overpopulated and became dominated by technology, there were long established travel-ways on all continents. Before the Norsemen and Columbus found “North America” (the original name being lost), the continent was crisscrossed by a trail system chiseled into the earth…

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Bartram’s Reminiscences

Bartram’s Reminiscences By Lamar Marshall Cultural Heritage Director, Wild South (printed in the NC Bartram Trail Society Newsletter March 2014) When I first read Bartram’s account of his visit to the Cherokee Middle Towns in 1775, I was particularly interested in the details of his journey after he left the site of Fort Prince George…

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